Waterfalls of India

A Miniature Sheet consisting of 4 nos of commemorative postage stamps on the Indian Waterfalls :

1993 Waterfalls of India [Souvenior Sheet of 4 stamps 2003]
 Issued by
India

Issued on Oct 3, 2003

Issued for : The Department of Posts is happy to issue a set of 4 commemorative postage stamps on the Waterfalls of India.

Credits :
Stamp
, Miniature Sheet & FDC : Suresh Kumar
Cancellation : Alka Sharma

Type : Miniature Sheet, Mint Condition

Watermark : No

Colour : Four Colour

Denomination : 500, 1500, 500 & 500 Paise

Size : 13.50 x 8.80 cms.

Stamp Overall Size : 2.90 x 3.91 cms.

Stamp Print Size : 2.90 x 3.91 cms.

Perforation : 13.5 x 13.5 mm

Paper : Matt Chromo

Stamps Printed : 0.8 million each

Miniature Sheet : 0.05 million

Number per issue sheet : 40

Printing Process : Photo Offset

Printer : Calcutta Security Printers Ltd.

About : 

  • Nature’s resplendence unfolds itself and charms mankind in myriad ways. Snow-capped mountains, fathomless oceans, gushing streams, lush green meadows and the extremely diverse and delightful flora and fauna leave man fascinated and spellbound. Waterfalls are lyrical expressions formed in the journey of a river when it falls vertically from a height over a rock or a precipice. Their beauty not only enchants but also boosts the economy of the region for they develop into popular tourist spots. The Department of Posts has tried to capture the beauty and exuberance of four waterfalls of India in this set of stamps.
  • The first stamp depicts the picturesque Athirapally waterfall located on the fringes of the famous Sholayar forest ranges of Kerala. About 80 feet high, it crashes through gorges into the Chalakkudy river. From the motorable road at Athirapally, a bridleway takes visitors close to the spot where the Chalakkudy river plummets down a drop of 80 feet. Misty waters cascade down a rocky terrain to flow downstream into the meandering river.
  • The second stamp depicts the world-famous Jog or Gerusoppa waterfall located northwest of Shimoga city of Karnataka in a hamlet called Jog. The Sharavati river flowing over a rocky bed takes a spectacular leap from a height of 292 metres and divides into four smaller distinct falls known as the ‘Raja’, the ‘Roarer’, the ‘Rocket’ and the ‘Rani’. The scenic effect is greatly heightened by the luxuriant vegetation around the area presenting a sense of transcendent grandeur and sublimity. The Mahatma Gandhi hydroelectric station here was commissioned in 1948 and has a capacity of 112000 KW.
  • The third stamp depicts the magnificent Kempty falls located about 15 kms from Mussoorie and 50 kms from Dehradun on the MussoorieYamunotri road in Uttaranchal. With water cascading down from an altitude of 4500 feet and splitting into five smaller falls, the Kempty waterfall offers a panoramic view. The name Kempty is probably derived from ‘camptea’ as the British would organise their tea parties there. Combined with the surrounding greenery, the view infuses freshness into any tired soul. A bath at the foot of the falls is even more refreshing.
  • The fourth stamp depicts the ebullient Kakolat waterfall located about 33.6 kms from Nawada on the Ranchi Road in Bihar. The fall is about 150-160 feet and just below it, there is a deep reservoir natural in character. Some weapons dating back to the Stone Age have been excavated from the area. Legend has it that in the Treta Yuga a king named Nigas was cursed by a rishi and had to take the shape of python and lived here. The place was visited by the great Pandavas during their exile and the accursed king got salvation from the damnation. The king, after getting rid of the curse, proclaimed that one who would bathe in the waterfall will not be reborn as a snake and that is why a large number of people from far and near bathe in the river. A big fair is held for three days on the occasion of bishua or Chait Shankranti.
  • Text : Based on material received from the sponsor.

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