Bombay and Bangalore G.P.O.

Complete Set of 2 nos of postage stamps on the ‘India89′, World Philatelic Exhibition, New Delhi held between 20.1.89 to 29.1.89 :

Bangalore GPO (General Post Office)Mumbai GPO (General Post Office)Issued by India

Issued on Oct 9, 1988

Issued for : The Department of Posts, Govt. of India is bringing out a series of postage stamps to herald INDIA-89 World Philatelic Exhibition to be held in New Delhi from 20-29 January, 1989.

Description of Design : The stamp on Bombay G.P.O. is designed by Shri C.R. Pakrashi and the one on Bangalore G.P.O. by Shri C.L. Meena. The first day cover carries an extract from the letter of the Court of Directors of the East India Company to the Council at Bombay dated 27th Aug., 1688. The design for this is by Smt. Alka Sharma and the cancellation is by Smt. Nenu Gupta. The special cancellation for World Post Day carries the logo of the Universal Postal Union and is designed by Smt. Alka Sharma.

Type : Blocks of 4 Stamps, Mint Condition

Colour : Multicolour

Denomination : 400 & 500 Paise

Overall Size : 3.91 x 2.90 cms.

Printing Size : 3.55 x 2.54 cms.

Perforation : 13 x 13

Paper : Imported un W/M Adh. Gr. coated stamp paper

Number Printed : 15,00,000 each

Number per issue sheet : 6 sheetlets

Printing Process : Photogravure

Printer : India Security Press

About : 

  • The Department of Posts, Govt. of India is bringing out a series of postage stamps to herald INDIA89 World Philatelic Exhibition to be held in New Delhi from 20-29 January, 1989.
  • The first set consisting of two stamps in this series depicted the logo and venue of the exhibition. The second set consisting of four stamps showed four historic monuments of Delhi, the city where the exhibition is being held. The present third set consisting of two stamps are on Postal buildings depicting Bombay G.P.O. and Bangalore G.P.O. as samples of early & the latest architecture.
  • A Postmaster was appointed in Bombay in 1787 while Bombay G.P.O. was opened in 1794. It was first located in the Fort in a building near Apollo Pier. In 1869 it was shifted to the present C.T.O. building and it finally moved to its present building in 1913. However, there is an earlier reference to the establishment of a Post Office in Bombay in 1688 when the Court of Directors of the East India Company instructed the Council at Bombay vide a letter dated 27.8.1688 – We likewise require you to erect a Post Office for all letters to be brought to and delivered at, setting such rate upon each single letter, and so proportionably upon double and treble letters, as may in a few years bring in insensibly a vast revenue to the Company : and a much greater conveniency to merchants and trade in general than ever they yet had or understood..
  • However it is not fully certain whether at all a post office was actually set up or not. This is an area where active research can bear fruitful results.
  • The Imperial Post Office was first established in Bangalore in 1800, elevated as Head Post office in 1854. It was shifted to a single-storeyed building constructed for the Residency near Cubbon Park, but a century later a more modern and specious building was required to meet Bangalore‘s expanding postal network. After much thought a six storeyed building with basement came up at the junction of Raj Bhavan Road and Dr. Ambedkar Veedhi, planned by the architects and constructed under the supervision of the Civil Engineers of the P&T Deptt.
  • The building is a mixture of traditional and modern construction in design and in material. The podium and the sides of the building are of fine chiselled stone masonry with pillars and corridors all along. The rear of the building is faced with cement lattice work. The building has three domes, cast in R.C.C. and veneered with stones. The counter hall has an imposing height of 28′ and a wooden chandelier. The plinth area of the building is 1,90,711 sq. ft. and the carpet area is about 1,10,043 sq. ft. The building was inaugurated by the Prime Minister of India on 15.11.85. Today this building is considered a major landmark in Bangalore.

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