Japan on Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1983

A commemorative postage stamp on the 35th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), adopted by the United Nations in 1948 :

UDHR SymbolIssued by Japan

Issued on Dec 5, 1983

Issued for : A 60 yen postage stamp commemorating the 35th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be issued on December 5, 1983.

Design : Symbol of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Type : Stamp, Postal Used

Colour : Multicolour

Denomination : 60 yen

Size of impression : 22.5 mm x 27.0 mm

Quantity issued : 37,000,000 stamps

About : 

  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was resolved at the 3rd General Assembly of the United Nations on December 10, 1948.
  • The Declaration, which consists of a preamble and thirty articles, manifests to the world, “as Common Standards to be achieved by all peoples and all nations” (preamble), human rights and fundamental liberties, such as freedom and equality, the right to work, the right to receive education and social security, etc.
  • The United Nations has selected Dec. 10 as “Human Rights Day” when all nations are expected to celebrate the resolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  • In Japan, December 4 to December 10 is “Human Rights Week“, and the Ministry of Justice and its related bodies receive national cooperation in the holding of lectures and film showings, and in using television and newspapers to make a call to the people to raise their consciousness about human rights in conjunction with other events.
  • This year marks the 35th anniversary and the Ministry of Justice has selected the following themes to be emphasized during “Human Rights Week”.
    • Coexistence of human rights – Let us enrich our human relationships through the understanding and respect of others’ rights and positions.
    • Let us eliminate discrimination against the “buraku” class.
    • Let us improve the position of women.
    • Let us give the handicapped the right to participate fully and equally in society.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *